How Industry Software Expertise is Helping to Solve the Android Fragmentation Dilemma

It is no secret:  While Google continues to push for wide adoption of smartphones driven by its open source Android platform, most industry pundits know that manufacturers typically need upwards of a full year of development and productization effort (and often Google’s help) to develop an Android phone. Not surprisingly, it takes much longer for an OEM to reach a…

Open Source Symbian and the Inescapable Truth of Product Lifecycles

The announcement one year ago that Symbian will be open sourced under a license free platform in 1HCY10 was heard around the world. If we are to believe game theory, the motivations behind this move are not a non-zero sum game but rather one of rational choice by its major stakeholders. But what does Open Source Symbian really mean for…

The Mobile Device Investor and the Bubblegum Theory

While we still don't know the impact of Ovi, iPhone, or Android on the dynamics of tomorrow's device landscape, we know that "End Users" have evolved into sophisticated buyers of new devices, especially as subsidies gradually decline.  Although I don't think anyone quite knows where the value is going in the new mobile ecosystem (is it migrating to software, devices,…

Will the Software Stack Make the Market for Mobile Internet Devices?

I love the mobile industry because everyone, even my cat, has somehow turned into an industry sage, predicting that just about anything can and will happen in mobile as the dark clouds collect on the economic horizon.  Are there any bright spots (to use an overused analogy this week) left in mobile after we hear of precipitous drops in chipset…

Operators return to Barcelona, (this time) armed with Open Source

Scene Setter26 years after GSM was created to design a pan-European mobile technology, Mobile World Congress number 13 is set to take place in Barcelona in February. This time around, as they did when GSM World Congress was first held in Madrid in 1995, mobile network operators will dominate the scene.  Next month, however, the topic of discussion will not…

An Industry and Technology Revolution is on the Horizon

Limo, and in a slightly different way Android, have killed the standards-based approach to open source development in mobile. In the Linux world, creating an esoteric, theoretical application standard not based on market-driven code requires too much speculative investment without any clear mitigation of ROI risk for anyone to take up anymore. Indeed, the days of a bunch of representative…

The Check is in the Mail, Do No Evil and Other Matters of Trust

All will agree that mobile Linux suffers from fragmentation today, and that fragmentation •    creates significant challenges to Linux adoption in mobile phones (lack of interoperability et. al.)  •    presents barriers to innovation •    increases the carrier cost to Linux terminal deployment. For Linux to succeed in the mobile market, we need to minimize fragmentation and its…

Open Handset Alliance and LiMo – Why both initiatives are here to stay

It's easy to take the fragmentation of the mobile phone industry for granted. With over 40 different proprietary and Open Source Middleware and Application Frameworks addressing Ultra Low Cost, Entry, Feature and Smart Phone market segments, software costs have exploded and are expected to hit some 25% of the entire Bill of Materials on a mobile phone this year. No…