Archive For March, 2010

6 articles

Blog: Raw Power – Again

Nice blog post from Ed Sperling on the performance of modern day processors. Some interesting tidbits from his post: A Xeon on 3.46 Ghz uses up to 130 Watt, bring this down to 2.66 Ghz and you drop 50 Watt to 80 Watt. This is how a chip with multiple cores running at a lower frequency can deliver more performance…

Virtualization For Failover

Discussions with customers about multicore and virtualization often provides them with new insights with respect to the designs that they can use to build their systems. One particular discussion that I had last week was with a customer that is building a device that needs a particular level of service quality. In the past they had looked at adding another…

Article: New OS Approach Required

Even Microsoft agrees, a high-core count processor requires a different operating system. People that are building embedded systems on high core count processors are already familiar with this approach. Examples of high core count processors are the latest from Freescale (P4080), Intel (Nehalem/Westmere), Cavium (Octeon Plus) and others.Running a single SMP operating system over all these cores is possible, but…

Virtualization and Fault Handling

In several of my previous posts I have written about the fact that embedded virtualization has low overhead, maintains determinism and all that good stuff. I have also written about some of the benefits of virtualization due to partitioning, scalability and such.However, there is one aspect of virtualization that gets little 'air time' and that is the fact that there…

Hypervisors in Mobile

I received a bunch of emails today pointing to this blog from Jason Perlow. Jason has an interesting thought with regards to the Apple and HTC lawsuit that is brewing. Let me first say that I understand that companies have to protect their IP and that there are clearly important and enforceable patents out there, say Coca Cola's formula for…

A sea of cores, now what?

A great number of cores gives more processing power, but this power needs to be harnessed. The easiest way to control a sea of cores is of course to run a single operating system over this sea in a Symmetric MultiProcessing mode (SMP). Most modern operating systems support this (which includes Wind River Linux and VxWorks of course). The trick…